Found along the roadside, Awesome Coffee is a simple yet standout establishment among a strip of banks, real estate agencies and other businesses on District 7’s Nguyen Van Linh.

An Nam Parlour is a peaceful retreat from motorbike horns, yelling vendors and clumsy backpackers of the Old Quarter.

 

Although Thuong Tra opened only three months ago, the concept dates back to 2010, when Nguyen Viet Bac opened his first teahouse. Inspired while travelling through the mountainous areas of northern Vietnam, Bac knew he needed to bring the traditional tea culture to Hanoi, while giving the practice the respect it deserved. He admired the art of tea ceremonies, and decided to create his own place where everyone could enjoy tea from all around Vietnam, in the heart of Hanoi.

A miniature artery from District 1 to District 5, Pham Viet Chanh is one of Saigon’s most hectic streets. Motorbikes scream down this road, cars make no apologies, local businesses line one side, a rather alarming hospital sits back from the tarmac, and in the middle of it all is a little slice of quiet, polite delicacy — 1985 Cafe.

Many Vietnamese coffee drinkers are casual about what goes into their daily brew. But for one man from Dalat, it is unthinkable that consumers in the second-largest coffee exporting country in the world have to drink additive-filled coffee.

It’s the Sunday following Independence Day and the streets are quiet. The cloud cover shifts, slowly illuminating the impressive shop front of Café 81. Its postcard-like appearance draws the first of many amateur photographers. What lies through its doorway is unclear, the dimmed seclusion creating a sense of mystery.

The word “trill” comes from American hip-hop vernacular, a combination of the words “true” and “real”. Trill Cafe, then, might be a bit deceptive. It’s not limited to being a café — there’s a pool, a gym, a dinner menu, an event space — in fact, I’m not sure what it is.

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